$89 for 2 Round Trip Tickets to the Caribbean

Home/Travel Tips/$89 for 2 Round Trip Tickets to the Caribbean
NOTE: This opportunity has EXPIRED. Please see our post on Getting a Trip to Hawaii for Almost Nothing!

For a very limited time, you can get a round trip ticket to Hawaii for only $89.  How?  Simple.  Right now Barclay’s is offering the U.S. Air Dividend Miles credit card (EXPIRED) with a bonus of 50,000 miles after your very first purchase on the card.  These miles are currently redeemable on U.S. Air for award tickets on U.S. Air, BUT the value comes in the fact that Dividend Miles will soon be converted to AAdvantage Miles which are redeemable for American Airlines.  The conversion is taking place during the 2nd quarter of 2015.  $89 is the annual fee to get the card.

What are these 50,000 miles good for?  Well, they are super valuable for travel to the Caribbean or Hawaii!  Click here to open the AAdvantage Award Chart.  Slide down until you run into the U.S. 48, Alaska Canada – Caribbean.  Then slide over to the blue tinted “MileSAAver” column.  You can see that a MileSAAver Level 2 Economy ticket costs 17,500 miles (12,500 is available for certain times).  That is for a one way economy ticket to the Caribbean, so round trip is 17,500 x 2 = 35,000 miles.  You would still have 15,000 points left over!


So what qualifies as the Caribbean?  Well, that would be anywhere that American Airlines classifies as the Caribbean, which is about 40 locations, some of which include:  Anguilla, Aruba, the Bahamas, Belize, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman Island, Virgin Islands, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Turks and Caicos, and many more!  Note: it is always best to book early when using rewards to get the best availability, but here is what I am presented with if I was searching today (March, 16, 2015) for a trip during my Fall break, Oct 3rd-Oct 18th, 2015.  So after I’ve received my 50K miles in my AAdvantage account, I go to “Book Award Travel”, and put in where I want to go.  Personally I love Grand Cayman, so I choose my departure city (DEN – Denver) and my destination (GCM – Grand Cayman), I chose the dates that I want to see availability, because I can leave at any time during my break.  I also chose round trip:

AA-GrandCayman

 

Then I was presented with 2 calendars (to choose my trip out and back), showing how many miles each way (in green).  I have selected to go out on the 3rd and return on the 12th – (they are only 12,500 miles each way!!):

AA-GrandCayman-calendar

 

Then you are taken to a screen where you choose from the flights that are available, and check out.  Since my ticket was only 25,000 round-trip, I can take my spouse for free as well!  Traveling using miles is one of the most price effective ways to travel.  If you can provide a little bit of flexibility or book your award travel early, you can get outstanding deals!  This trip would’ve cost $1,443.50 USD ( for 2 travelers) if we didn’t use miles:

AA-GrandCayman-cost

 

A round trip ticket to Hawaii using miles would have cost 35,000 miles per person during the same dates (which they had good availability during the same dates in October).  DEN to HNL would have cost $993 per person, round trip (below is the cost for 2 travelers):

AA-Hawaii-cost

U.S. Air is merging with American Airlines, so it provides this unique opportunity to get the U.S. Airways Dividend Miles credit card (EXPIRED) now, and reap the 50,000 miles on American Airlines in a few months!  This opportunity won’t last long, so it’s best to get in now before it goes away.


If you are wondering how applying for credit cards effect your credit score, please read my other post “Does Applying for Credit Cards Hurt My Credit Score?“.  You might be pleasantly surprised!

Full Disclosure: We want to acknowledge that we receive a referral fee fo[/fusion_builder_column]r some of the offers that we present to our users.

 

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By | 2017-05-18T12:46:51+00:00 March 16th, 2015|Travel Tips|0 Comments

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